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Questions

What is the contemporary relationship between monolingualism and the various modern 
nation-states that historically sought to establish a “unified identity” under that
umbrella?

How have campaigns and traditions of multilingual literacy in the global South begun to redefine normative assumptions about language, in policy and scholarship?

How have multilingual phenomena over the past two decades outpaced or otherwise challenged the theories we have developed to account for those phenomena? What new categories of analysis may be necessary to account for them?

What is monolingualism? Is it a species-wide norm or a historical aberration? What might “monoliteracy” mean?

How does multilingualism interact with other symbolic systems? What is the relationship between multilingualism, multiliteracy, multimodality, and/or multicompetence?

What is monolingualism? Is it a species-wide norm or a historical aberration? What might “monoliteracy” mean?

If monolingual is a historical construction, then is multilingualism therefore an untenable object of analysis? If multilingualism is founded on an assumption that we are shifting away from a monolingual perspective, how sound is that assumption? Can one shift away from that which doesn't exist in the first place?

What is the contemporary relationship between monolingualism and the various modern
nation-states that historically sought to establish a “unified identity” under that
umbrella?

How and to what effect has multilingualism been conflated with multiculturalism in academic research and public policy?

Multilingualism can be discussed on the level of the neuron, tongue, brain, organism, body, utterance, individual, subject, affect, conversation, family, group, text, community, discourse, polity, technology, medium, region, policy, ethnos, nation, etc. What other categories of analysis—or combination of these categories—might prove salient for a greater understanding of multilingual phenomena in a given context?

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